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#8725468 - 07/15/16 03:42 AM Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday
Battlestooge Offline
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Registered: 03/09/02
Posts: 12434
Loc: OH
Ordered a camera last night and will go pick it up Wednesday from Best Buy. I'm completely new and ignorant to all things photography but this has been an itch I had to scratch for some time now.

For right now I have a Panasonic G7 with just the kit lense on the way. I want to do a mix of stills and 1080p video (4k down the road) just as a hobby. I don't want to dive into all kinds of extra gear or lenses anytime soon. Just want to learn the ins and outs before spending much more money.

Any good resources out there you guys like? I've been searching on YouTube trying to learn what I can.

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#8725554 - 07/15/16 09:00 AM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: Battlestooge]
trench301 Offline
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Registered: 02/16/03
Posts: 2736
Welcome to the club! "Understanding Exposure" is a great book I read when I started out, covered all the bases in plain language. My other advice is to start shooting RAW and in Manual mode right off the bat. The faster you learn how to control the shot and final product yourself the better off you'll be.
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#8725923 - 07/15/16 01:29 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: trench301]
chef Offline
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Registered: 04/27/00
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Yeah, just try to get a solid understanding of the three parts of an exposure, ISO, Shutter Speed, and Aperture. Once you understand how they interact with each other, you'll be able to control whether you want thin depth of field, deep depth of field, or if you want to drag the shutter to show motion, or freeze action, etc. As you understand what each of those three items does and how the others react, then you'll know when to use an auto mode, like Aperture Priority, to force a specific depth of field, and then which metering mode to use for the processor to figure out what the exposure should be. I listened to Photo Focus a lot early on, a podcast, and the guy is a total blowhard but there was a lot of info that was applicable. Same with Ken Rockwell. Use his setup guides to really understand the different settings in your camera. You don't have to use what he suggests, but if you understand what each thing does, you'll be able to decide how you want your camera to work best for you.
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#8725925 - 07/15/16 01:30 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: trench301]
tenplanescrashing Moderator Offline
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Registered: 01/23/04
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 Originally Posted By: trench301
Welcome to the club! "Understanding Exposure" is a great book I read when I started out, covered all the bases in plain language. My other advice is to start shooting RAW and in Manual mode right off the bat. The faster you learn how to control the shot and final product yourself the better off you'll be.

I'll give a different perspective...
Don't start worrying about RAW and manual right off the bat unless you learn better that way. RAW vs. JPEG is irrelevant in all sense of the word when it comes to photography. Editing, yes, but photography no. I almost rarely use RAW as well...only for the most important shoots. Everything else, I just use JPEG High. I get plenty of DR and flexibility in editing and don't have to worry about storage issues (and speed).

Also, manual mode is personal preference. To this day, I use manual mode maybe 10-15% of the time (mainly off camera lighting, panorama shots, or areas where I need to keep the exposure consistent). I'd say learn ALL the modes (P,S,A,M) and how they affect your shooting style and situation.

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#8725972 - 07/15/16 02:22 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: tenplanescrashing]
trench301 Offline
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Registered: 02/16/03
Posts: 2736
 Originally Posted By: tenplanescrashing
 Originally Posted By: trench301
Welcome to the club! "Understanding Exposure" is a great book I read when I started out, covered all the bases in plain language. My other advice is to start shooting RAW and in Manual mode right off the bat. The faster you learn how to control the shot and final product yourself the better off you'll be.

I'll give a different perspective...
Don't start worrying about RAW and manual right off the bat unless you learn better that way. RAW vs. JPEG is irrelevant in all sense of the word when it comes to photography. Editing, yes, but photography no. I almost rarely use RAW as well...only for the most important shoots. Everything else, I just use JPEG High. I get plenty of DR and flexibility in editing and don't have to worry about storage issues (and speed).

Also, manual mode is personal preference. To this day, I use manual mode maybe 10-15% of the time (mainly off camera lighting, panorama shots, or areas where I need to keep the exposure consistent). I'd say learn ALL the modes (P,S,A,M) and how they affect your shooting style and situation.


I get what you're saying and I don't disagree, let me expound on my reasoning a little. I see people all over the photography groups on FB talking about RAW and manual mode like its some great canyon they have to cross. They've been shooting automatic with jpeg and are scared of manual and RAW. They use DLSRs like point and shoots, which is fine, can't beat the image quality, but I'd use the term "photographer" loosely with them.

I just think that if you start off with Raw and manual, you are forced to learn the basics quicker; exposure, white balance, post processing etc. You learn how to make the tool record your final vision. Once you understand what you need the camera to do to capture the scene as you see it, then you can start trusting the camera to make certain decisions for you through Av and Tv mode. Beginners make a lot of mistakes (hell even more experiences photogs do too) and a RAW workflow gives you more flexibility to correct those mistakes in post. Just my $.02

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#8725982 - 07/15/16 02:38 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: trench301]
LNXGUY Offline
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Registered: 08/06/00
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Loc: Barrie, Ont,
RAW, Av, Tv, read, you'll be fine.
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#8726329 - 07/15/16 08:27 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: trench301]
chef Offline
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Registered: 04/27/00
Posts: 23758
Loc: The OC
 Originally Posted By: trench301
You learn how to make the tool record your final vision. Once you understand what you need the camera to do to capture the scene as you see it, then you can start trusting the camera to make certain decisions for you through Av and Tv mode. Beginners make a lot of mistakes (hell even more experiences photogs do too) and a RAW workflow gives you more flexibility to correct those mistakes in post. Just my $.02
yeah, just having an understanding of how the exposure triangle works lets you be an informed participant while chasing which auto mode to use. that's one of the biggest reasons for getting a dslr, everyone wants one because they take better pictures, but they take better pictures because you have more control, so learn how to use that control, and how to control the processor, and you'll be a winner!

i do use the shit out of raw files though, bringing back blown out skies or popping shadows just a bit.... plus i can then control the sharpening and etc etc myself.


Edited by chef (07/15/16 08:28 PM)
_________________________
Why choose mac? "Well, huh, might as, might as well ask why is a tree good? Why is the sunset good? Why are boobs good?" RRLSi
"put that money into a new imac damn it. it's the bomb" jsmonet
"This all fuckin' day. Feel the 900MB/sec of glory. It's like a digital money shot all over your face." RRLSi
Order my photo prints (New files uploaded)

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#8726332 - 07/15/16 08:34 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: chef]
Battlestooge Offline
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Registered: 03/09/02
Posts: 12434
Loc: OH
Definitely want to learn manual settings first and shoot in raw. Learn the basics now and I can do whatever I want in the future.
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#8726708 - 07/16/16 02:22 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: Battlestooge]
skierd Offline
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Registered: 08/21/01
Posts: 9104
Loc: Fairbanks, AK
Might as well shoot in raw+jpeg so you have both.

Aperture controls depth of field. Bigger apertures (smaller numbers) give shallower depth of field, which is the area in the image that's in focus, while a smaller aperture (bigger number) gives a wider depth of field. Distance counts too, the closer the object you're focused on the smaller the depth of field. Basically this lets you decide what and how much of your image is in focus.

Shutter speed controls motion. A faster shutter speed (1/250, 1/500, and faster) will freeze motion. A slower shutter speed (1/10, 1/4s, etc) will allow moving objects to blur and can also cause blurring due to camera shake. Moderate speeds in the 1/30-1/125 range will freeze most people movements but maybe not wind blown trees or fast moving objects.

ISO controls light sensitivity. Bright sun means you have lots of light to work with and can run a low ISO, dark rooms require higher ISO to be sensitive enough to capture an image at workable shutter speeds and apertures.

The art and skill of photography is finding the balance between the three to make an effective exposure and that works with whatever you composed in the viewfinder.


Edited by skierd (07/16/16 02:23 PM)
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#8726714 - 07/16/16 02:35 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: skierd]
Battlestooge Offline
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Registered: 03/09/02
Posts: 12434
Loc: OH
Picking up the camera tonight. Didn't feel like waiting to Wednesday when I'm off for three days right now to play around. Found a store somewhat nearby that has it in stock.
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#8728917 - 07/19/16 09:19 AM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: Battlestooge]
flyEX #1 Administrator Offline
Man in the Box
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Registered: 01/05/00
Posts: 26631
Loc: Down in a Hole
If I could only recommend one YouTube resource it would be Tony & Chelsea Northrup. His background in writing tech guides translates over to photography well. Smart guy who can explain anything simply.
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#8729587 - 07/19/16 04:15 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: flyEX #1]
Battlestooge Offline
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Registered: 03/09/02
Posts: 12434
Loc: OH
I've watched a few of theirs so far. It's good stuff.
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#8755557 - 08/10/16 04:07 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: Battlestooge]
uniqueRyanunique Offline
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Registered: 03/11/01
Posts: 15027
Loc: Orange, CA.
One thing about the "Exposure Triangle" that took me a while to figure out was the term "stop of light".


Not only do you need to know what the "Exposure Triangle is, (aperture, shutter speed, ISO), you'll need to know what the term "stop of light" is referring to. They go hand in hand, and I feel the "stop of light" references don't get covered at all in a lot of "Exposure Triangle" videos.


Essentially, if you tweak some settings on the exposure, you'll need to counter those settings in the opposite direction to get the same exact exposure.

Just know...a "correct exposure" is a matter of opinion. For you, as a beginner, assume it means nice even lighting across the image.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpUpq_eo4F0

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#8755576 - 08/10/16 04:17 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: skierd]
uniqueRyanunique Offline
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Registered: 03/11/01
Posts: 15027
Loc: Orange, CA.
 Originally Posted By: skierd

Aperture controls depth of field. Bigger apertures (smaller numbers) give shallower depth of field, which is the area in the image that's in focus, while a smaller aperture (bigger number) gives a wider depth of field. Distance counts too, the closer the object you're focused on the smaller the depth of field. Basically this lets you decide what and how much of your image is in focus.



It has two functions really...light sensitivity and depth of field.


 Originally Posted By: skierd

Shutter speed controls motion. A faster shutter speed (1/250, 1/500, and faster) will freeze motion. A slower shutter speed (1/10, 1/4s, etc) will allow moving objects to blur and can also cause blurring due to camera shake. Moderate speeds in the 1/30-1/125 range will freeze most people movements but maybe not wind blown trees or fast moving objects.


Like Aperture, Shutter speed also has two functions...motion blur or lack there of and ambient light sensitivity.


 Originally Posted By: skierd

ISO controls light sensitivity. Bright sun means you have lots of light to work with and can run a low ISO, dark rooms require higher ISO to be sensitive enough to capture an image at workable shutter speeds and apertures.


Like the previous two, ISO also has two functions...Light sensitivity and sharpness/graininess.

All three settings can control light differently, but they all have their own unique function as well.

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#8761883 - 08/15/16 09:50 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: uniqueRyanunique]
skierd Offline
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Registered: 08/21/01
Posts: 9104
Loc: Fairbanks, AK
Umm... no. Aperture and shutter speed do not control how light sensitive the sensor or film emulsion is, they only control how much light is let through the lens.
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#8762687 - 08/16/16 01:49 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: skierd]
uniqueRyanunique Offline
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Registered: 03/11/01
Posts: 15027
Loc: Orange, CA.
 Originally Posted By: skierd
Umm... no. Aperture and shutter speed do not control how light sensitive the sensor or film emulsion is, they only control how much light is let through the lens.


I use the word "sensitivity" a little loosely. All 3 functions control light; yet, each have a unique function of their own. How about that?

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#8762805 - 08/16/16 03:08 PM Re: Joining ClubPhoto Wednesday [Re: skierd]
tenplanescrashing Moderator Offline
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Registered: 01/23/04
Posts: 40339
 Originally Posted By: skierd
Umm... no. Aperture and shutter speed do not control how light sensitive the sensor or film emulsion is, they only control how much light is let through the lens.

ACTUALLY... ;\)
Only the aperture controls how much light is let through the lens. Shutter controls how long light is allowed to be recorded by the sensor. ISO controls how sensitive the sensor is to said light.


Edited by tenplanescrashing (08/16/16 03:08 PM)

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